Summer 2018 Climate Digest

The global land and ocean surface temperature for June-August 2018 was 1.33° Fahrenheit (0.74 °C ) above average and the fifth warmest summer on records.

Looking at land temperatures only, 2018 was the fifth highest June-August on record.

Looking at sea surface temperatures, our global oceans also experienced the fifth warmest summer on record.

Of note – the last five years (2014–2018) comprise the five warmest June-August on record. 2016 was the warmest summer so far, boosted by a strong El Niño.

In the United States, the average temperature for the Lower 48 was 73.5°F, or about 2° above average, tying with 1934 as the fourth warmest summer on record. The summer precipitation total for the contiguous U.S. was nearly 9 inches, over half of an inch above average, ranking summer 2018 us as the 25th wettest summer on record.

The nationally averaged overnight low temperatures were record warm this summer, 2.5 degrees above average – beating out 2016 for the warmest summer nights on record.

In general, the U.S. summer overnight low temperatures are warming at a rate nearly twice as fast as afternoon high temperatures. The 10 warmest summer minimum temperatures have all occurred since 2002.

Hot and dry weather in the Southwest contributed to another devastating wildfire season this past summer, especially in California. The Mendocino Complex fire north of San Francisco became the largest on record at 422,000 acres, or 660 square miles, or roughly half the size of the state of Rhode Island. Five of the seven largest fires on record in California have occurred since 2012. But California wasn’t the only state battling wildfires –  several neighboring states and Canada also experienced large and prolonged wildfires.

The quarterly climate digest, produced seasonally, consists of a short movie (4:17 minutes) made for Science On a Sphere® (SOS) and an MP4 video accessible through YouTube.

You can download the SOS content from this FTP Site.

Content includes:
– Global 3-month land temperatures
– 3-month Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies
– Global Wildfires for June, July and August 2018 (from NOAAView)
– Select MODIS and GOES-16 imagery of U.S. Wildfires

References:
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201808
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/national/201808
http://wxguys.ssec.wisc.edu/2018/09/10/summer2018/

Credits:
EarthNow Team
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA)

Monthly state of the climate reports are available from NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Global Analysis and National Overview at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/

 

Category: Uncategorized

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Spring 2018 Climate Digest

The global land and ocean surface temperature for March–May 2018 was 1.48° Fahrenheit (0.82 °C ) above the 20th century average of 56.7°F and the fourth warmest spring in 139 years of records.

Looking at land temperatures only, 2018 was the fifth highest March–May on record.

Looking at sea surface temperatures, our global oceans experienced the fourth warmest spring on record.

Of note – May 2018 marks the 401st consecutive month with global temperatures above the 20th century average.

In the United States, March 2018 had near normal temperatures, April was much colder than normal, and May was the warmest May since records began. The 3-month period ranked the 22nd warmest spring on record.

Record and near-record precipitation was observed across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States during spring 2018, largely due to slow-moving weather systems, including Subtropical Storm Alberto.

Alberto was unusual because it maintained strength over land, traveling as far north as the Great Lakes Region! Alberto reached Lake Huron as a remarkably well-defined system. In fact, Alberto is the first known tropical depression to travel so far north before June 1st, which is the official start date of Atlantic Hurricane Season.

The quarterly climate digest, produced seasonally, consists of a short movie (4:36 minutes) made for Science On a Sphere® (SOS) and an MP4 video accessible through YouTube.

You can download the SOS content from this FTP Site.

Content includes:
– Global 3-month land temperatures
– 3-month Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies
– GOES-East (GOES-16) multi-day animation of Subtropical Storm Alberto
– Graphic depicting new NOAA study results on Hurricane slow-down

References:
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201805
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/national/201805
https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/tropical-cyclone-slowdown

Credits:
EarthNow Team
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA)

Monthly state of the climate reports are available from NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Global Analysis and National Overview at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/

 

Category: Uncategorized

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Winter 2017-2018 Climate Digest

The December 2017–February 2018 average temperature across the global land and ocean surface was the fifth warmest since global records began in 1880. Looking at land only, the global land surface temperature was the seventh highest in the 1880–2018 record.

La Niña conditions were present across the tropical Pacific Ocean during the three-month period. The globally averaged ocean surface temperature was 0.99° Fahrenheit (0.55°C) above the 20th century average.

The United States was warmer and drier than normal over the winter months, resulting in low snowpack for western U.S. mountain ranges. California had its second driest winter on record. A prolonged period of warm and dry conditions combined with Santa Ana winds to fuel the largest wildfire in California’s modern recorded history. The Thomas Fire broke out in Ventura county in southern California on December 4th, and continued into the New Year. By the time it was contained on January 20th, it had burned 281,893 acres. To make matters worse, heavy rains on January 9th triggered debris flows in burn scar areas, causing flash floods that claimed 21 lives in neighboring Santa Barbara County.

The quarterly climate digest, produced seasonally, consists of a short movie (3:20 minutes) made for Science On a Sphere® (SOS) and an MP4 video accessible through YouTube.

You can download the SOS content from this FTP Site.

Content includes:
– Global 3-month land temperatures
– 3-month Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies
– GOES-15 IR animation of the Tomas Fire on December 5th, 2017
– MODIS False color imagery of the Thomas Fire Burn Scar

References:
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201802
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/national/201802
http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents/incidentdetails/Index/1922

Credits:
EarthNow Team
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA)

Monthly state of the climate reports are available from NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Global Analysis and National Overview at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/

 

Category: Climate, Climate Digest

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